2b. Configuring Extractions (Advanced)

There are some extractions that require a little extra TLC and need to be manually configured. To manually configure your extraction, click Ready.

Short Codes

Remember, you will only need to adjust these settings if your extractions are not working properly. Extractions can be manipulated by using Short Codes. Short Codes are used to tell Parsey the behavior of the email and Parsey can usually make an accurate guess on what will work. However, sometimes Parsey can get confused. That is why we give you the ability to manually edit the Short Codes. 

Let’s say that a lead comes in like this:

Name: Joe Smith
Phone: (555) 555-5555
Email: JoeSmith@example.com

Notice how after “Name:” there is a space, and after the name of the lead there is a "break" or "return". Parsey reads the email like this:

Name: {{space}}Joe{{space}}Smith{{break}}
Phone: {{space}}(555){{space}}555-5555{{break}}
Email: {{space}}JoeSmith@example.com{{break}}

That space must be included in your extractions in order for it to work properly.

So copy and paste this into your extraction for the First Name:

Start with: Name:{{space}}
End with: {{space}}

List of Short Codes

Here is a list of all of the Short Codes that Parsey can read and use.

  • {{beginning}} - Use this to start your extraction before the very first value in the email.
  • {{space}} - Use this whenever there is a space at the beginning or end of your extraction.
  • {{break}} - Break and Return can usually be inter-changeable. Use this when you want to end an extraction at the end of a line of text.
  • {{return}} - Break and Return can usually be inter-changeable. Use this when you want to end an extraction at the end of a line of text.
  • {{tab}} - Use this whenever there is a Tab at the beginning or end of your extraction.
  • {{end}} - You can use this Short Code to take everything between the start of your extraction to the End of the email.
  • % - Ah, the magical wildcard. Use this to skip anything between two other defined points.

Wild Card Example:

Address: 123 E Broadway Rd. Chandler, AZ 85204

Let's say you were trying to find the Zip in the address above. If AZ was the state that came through on all emails, you could just set the "Start Search" value to AZ{{space}} and your "Stop Search" value with {{break}}.

But, if the state value varies from email to email, you'd use a wild card. Set the "Start Search" value to ,{{space}}%{{space}} and your "Stop Search" value with {{break}}. This tells Parsey to look for a comma, space, anything at all, space. It will begin the extraction from there and go until whatever character(s) you have defined for your "Stop Search".

Wild Cards are most often used in the "Start Search" field to help you bypass data in order to arrive at the desired starting point. However, it can also be used in the "Stop Search" field if needed.

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